Reviews by CETF

Lessons Learned from the Field:  Connecting Californians to Broadband and Digital Careers

2013 CETF Grantee Performance Review
Presented to the Board of Directors

2012 CETF Grantee Performance Review
Presented to the Board of Directors

2011 CETF Grantee Performance Review
Presented to the Board of Directors

The Strategic Action Plan sets forth the values and commitments to operate with an intense focus on measureable outcomes, a discipline of continuous performance improvement, and a culture of accountability. After gathering and reviewing all the research regarding the Digital Divide, CETF identified 3 Priority Consumer Communities for grantmaking (each of which has tailored strategies and, thus, a distinctly different basis for evaluating performance):

  • Rural and Remote Areas
  • Urban Disadvantaged Neighborhoods
  • People with Disabilities

The Strategic Action Plan sets forth the values and commitments to operate with an intense focus on measureable outcomes, a discipline of continuous performance improvement, and a culture of accountability. The cohort from the initial analysis is referred to as CETF 1.0 grants and the analysis this year is referred to as CETF 2.0 grants, which includes the performance of NTIA sub-awardees and their partners.

This Initial Performance Analysis and Evaluation Report (Initial Report) focused primarily on 21 grants for Urban Disadvantaged Neighborhoods. The grants were made between 2007 and 2010. This third Performance Report provides an assessment of the 2 now completed NTIA grants, which finished between 2010 and 2013. CETF served as a grantee in each grant, with 19 sub-awardees, for a total of 21 grants. The Broadband Awareness and Adoption (BAA) grant that promoted Broadband Adoption among low-income households finished in January 2013, and the Access to Careers in Technology (ACT) grant that promoted Digital Literacy Training, Workforce Preparation and Jobs finished in June 2013.

The Strategic Action Plan also delineates the "5As of Broadband Adoption" as a framework to organize strategies and grants (Access, Application, Affordability, Accessibility, and Assistance) and 8 Program Categories as described below. The grants for Urban Disadvantaged Neighborhoods were analyzed within the framework of the "5As" according to the Program Category in which the outcomes most closely align. Most grantees achieved results in more than one of the 5As, however; their work was primarily focused in one of the Program Categories. ("360 Service" has been added to reflect work that is comprehensive in helping clients cross the Digital Divide.)
1. Access includes Smart Housing (in addition to Rural Demand Aggregation).
2. Application includes Computer Literacy Training, Workforce Preparation, Education and School-Related Programs, and Small Business Training.
3. Affordability includes Refurbishing/360 Service (providing training, a refurbished computer and access to affordable Internet Service).
4. Accessibility includes services to People with Disabilities (Disability).
5. Assistance includes Awareness.

Within these groupings of grants for Urban and Disadvantaged Communities, grantee performance was analyzed and evaluated for 3 Major Outcomes:

  • Results vs. Goals
  • Costs per Outcome
  • Lessons Learned